Joy Schaverien | Jung Today | Clinical and Cultural Perspectives | London 12th November 2016
Joy Schaverien PhD is a Jungian analyst, psychotherapist and supervisor with a private practice in Rutland in the East Midlands, UK. Joy writes and lectures extensively on a varied group of topics including psychoanalysis, gender in psychotherapy, art and psychoanalysis and the psychological effects of boarding school. Boarding School Syndrome describes common symptoms suffered by those affected by early boarding. Originator of the term her new book is to be published by Routledge in June 2015. Based on extensive research with ex-boarders, in psychotherapy and in semi-structured interviews, it depicts the enduring psychological effects of this trauma.
Joy Schaverien, Jungian analyst, Boarding School Syndrome, Boarding, School, Syndrome, Psychotherapist, supervisor, Private, Practice, Private Practice, Rutland, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Author, gender in psychotherapy, consultations, East Midlands
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Jung Today | Clinical and Cultural Perspectives | London 12th November 2016

nscience-logoA carefully created day designed to appeal to those who are curious about Jungian psychology, as well as to those familiar with it.

Presented by Chris Hauke Andrew Samuels and Joy Schaverien

London, 12 November 2016 (Saturday)9:45AM – 5:00PM 
Ambassadors Bloomsbury, 12 Upper Woburn Place, WC1H 0HX


Interest in Jungian and post-Jungian approaches to psychotherapy, counselling and analysis continues to grow. Jung is understood by many to have been a pioneering figure whose work anticipated many of today’s most exciting trends in psychotherapy and counselling. These may be in humanistic and integrative psychotherapy, and also in several schools of psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis.

Jung’s work and that of those who took up Jung’s original ideas – the post-Jungians – are also taught to a varying extent on courses in psychotherapy, counselling, psychoanalysis and the expressive arts therapies – as well as in departments of counselling and clinical psychology. Often, this leaves students and trainees hungry for more.

Jungian approaches to the therapy process address down-to earth questions of meaning and purpose, encompassing both personal and also transpersonal and spiritual dimensions of experience. The Jungian style of psychotherapy is relational with a special concern for embodied imagery, whether via dreams or creative expression.

During the morning session, three well-known Jungian analysts will share why they continue to find Jung to be an inspiring and reliable guide to therapy theory and practice. In the afternoon, they will introduce us to the latest contemporary applications of Jungian ideas in clinic and in culture.

Participants are encouraged to bring clinical vignettes and dilemmas.



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